Breed Alert
Breed
Email Id
 

Choose Dog Breed By Choice

  • Everyone like to have dogs at home but just because of size and neighbor disturbance we usually avoid having dogs at small home or apartments. We have few list of small dogs to keep in apartments.
  • Bull Dogs Bull dogs grows to an average height of 12-16 inch and weights 50-55 lbs, according to Dog Breed Info. It is energetic; it can play well with kids which makes a great companion to them. It will be calm and also courageous breed. Beagle I am not much familiar with Beagle but I analyzed that these breed is mostly used for hunting purpose and also attached to families. Since its toy breed, it can easily accommodate anywhere and also love playing with kids. As like kids, it never tried playing, always active. Usually Beagle used to be very friendly with everyone and also easy go with other pet animals like Cats and so. Labrador Retriever Labrador and Golden Retriever are similar breed. It will be a better choice for kids. It is very active and plays well with kids. Its obedient and intelligent makes us wonder and joyful. Poodle Here standard poodle is a good choice than the small breed. It shed their hair very little than the other breed which is good for children. It is smart and caring dog that can be a good partner with the child. Pug Pugs are playful, friendly and loves being with companion. Pugs are very playful and good partner for children. But Children should be careful while playing with it because Pugs are prone to eye injuries. Golden Retriever It is a sporting breed which is very energetic, active and it love playing with the kids. I it is extremely patience and makes service to their masters. It is closely related to Labrador For More Information, Click on the images name.
  • Now-a-day many dogs are brought for the style and royal which may be an imported variety. But buyers should know whether the dog is suited for the Indian climate and whether the dog can be adapted to the warm and hot climate? There are also Non-Indian dogs which are suited for the Indian climatic conditions. The dog breeds which are most suited to our climate are the Beagle, the Labrador, Dachshund, the Pug, Doberman Pinscher, Dalmatian, German Shepherd, Pomeranian are some of the dogs outside India can able to survey in India too under proper caring. The Labrador and Pomeranian sheds hair in hot climate needs extra care during that period. Most dogs sheds their hair in sunny season under proper maintenance you can able to control their sheds. Many Indians show interest in Siberian husky dogs because of their beauty. Siberian husky dogs lives in cold places and very active, they would like to run for a long distance. They love people and mostly need companion. If Siberian husky is kept in the cold climate or in A/c place, it will have good health and long life. As long I have seen and in my experience I would like to tell if you can maintain the same temperature as the native location of it then you can have any such types of breeds as your pets in any place. More over almost all dogs needs good exercise and running, regular Vet checkup, good diet makes the dogs more Energetic, Obedient and Healthy. Some Indian breeds are Indian Pariah, Caravan Hound or Mudhol Hound, Chippiparai, Rajapalayam dog, Rampur Hound, Kombai that will be good in their native climate. Click Here For More Topics
  • Plenty of Guard dogs need to be trained properly to know when to attack stranger and speedy alerts...
  • Planning to buy puppy for your kids? we will help you best breeds from our experience.

Stud Dog Listing

Cat Breed List

Cat For Sale List

Advertisement

Pet Clinics

The Best Veterinary ...
9533891604
Guntur
People For Animals -...
080-8603986
Bangalore
DOG CORNER
9937922113
BHUBANESWA
Choose your puppy name
Figaro
Gigolo
Khan
Growly
Caesar
Milo
Jaws
Jeeves
Exorcist
Pirate
Noel
Jekyll
mash
Charley
Planet
Lanza
Pernod
Babylon
Priceless
Appu

Dog Breed & Breeders

    • Country of Origin
      The Saint Bernard (also ‘St Bernard’, ‘St Bernhardshund’, or ‘Alpine Mastiff’) is a massive Swiss breed descending from the Roman Molossar and indigenous Swiss breeds. It was adapted in the seventeenth century to the purpose of mountain rescue at the Saint Bernard Hospice (named after an 11th century monk) in the Western Alps. The Saint Bernard would find lost travelers, lick them, and lie near them to warm them (they did not carry small barrels of brandy from their necks, as is often portrayed). The Saint Bernard continued in this role for centuries, saving thousands of lives. Prior to the 19th century the Saint Bernard was known as the ‘Saint Dog’ or ‘Barry Dog’, after a Saint Bernard from the early 1800’s who saved over 40 lives. Saint Bernards decreased in numbers in the 1800’s due to disease (and, by some sources, avalanches). They were crossed with the Newfoundland and other breeds to improve their numbers, introducing a long-coated variety. Today, the Saint Bernard is among the most popular large breeds. Famous Saint Bernards include Stephen King’s ‘Cujo’…actually, never mind— Famous Saint Bernards include Beethoven, hero of the ‘Beethoven’ series of films and Bamse, mascot of the Free Norwegian Forces in World War II, who served on board a navy ship and was awarded the ‘animal’ George’s Cross. Bamse was known to ride the bus to the local watering hole by herself and bring crew members back to the ship before curfew.

      Size
      The Saint Bernard has a shoulder height of 65-70 cm (25-28 in) and weighs at least 60 kg (132 lbs), up to 136 kg (300 lbs). The largest Saint Bernard on record, Benedictine, weighed 162 kg (357 lbs)! Saint Bernards have a large head with large upper lips (‘flews’), short, deep muzzle, and wrinkled forehead. They have a flat back, muscular legs, a broad, low-carried tail, and large feet. The Saint Bernard is a large powerhouse of an animal.

      Coat and Color
      The Saint Bernard can be rough or smooth haired. It is white with possible markings of black, red, brindle, tan, or a combination thereof. Most Saint Bernards have black ears. Show dogs must have white legs, chest, collar, tail tip and blaze (vertical line between the eyes). The Saint Bernard sheds twice a year.

      Character
      The Saint Bernard is friendly and good-natured. It will defend its owner and territory when threatened. The Saint Bernard is intensely loyal. It is likely to slobber.

      Temperament
      The Saint Bernard is friendly with children, other dogs, and household pets. It is playful and adventurous.

      Care
      Both coat types of Saint Bernard require weekly grooming with a brush and comb, more often when shedding. Bathe only as necessary. The ears must be kept clean and eyes checked regularly to prevent infection. The Saint Bernard has a lifespan of only 7-10 years. It is susceptible to hip and elbow dysplasia (malformed joints which can cause lameness or arthritis), which can be aggravated by obesity. Proper exercise and nutrition are important. The Saint Bernard is susceptible to epilepsy and eyelid disorders such as entropion and ectropion.

      Training
      Saint Bernards should be taught not to pull on the leash when young because they will grow to such large size. Patience must be exercised in training as the Saint Bernard can be stubborn.

      Activity
      Saint Bernards require daily exercise, but not an enormous amount as one might assume from their large size. Moderate walks or runs will keep them satisfied; they should be exercised enough to keep them from growing obese. The Saint Bernard will occasionally appreciate a longer walk or a chance to run free.
    • Country of Origin
      The Miniature Pinscher (also known as the ‘MinPin’ or ‘MiniPin’) is a German breed; ‘Pinscher’ is German for ‘Terrier’. The Miniature Pinscher does not descend from the Doberman Pinscher; this is a common mistake because the Doberman was introduced first to the U.S. The Miniature Pinscher is actually the older of the two breeds and is the likely source breed for the Doberman. The Miniature Pinscher descends from the German Pinscher, from whom it derives its black and tan coloring, the Dachshund, from whom it derives its courage and red coloration, and the Italian Greyhound, from whom it derives its playful demeanor and graceful gait. The earliest evidence of the Miniature Pinscher is a painting from the 1600’s of a small red dog similar in appearance to the MiniPin. The Miniature Pinscher was originally bred for small size, which resulted in a less appealing appearance than today’s dogs. The Miniature Pinscher’s popularity in its native Germany dipped in the early 1900’s; its survival was mostly due to Miniature Pinschers which had been exported to the U.S. prior to World War I. The Miniature Pinscher was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1929 and is today one of the most popular toy show dogs.

      Size
      The Miniature Pinscher has a shoulder height of 25-30 cm (10-12.5 in) and weighs 4-6 kg (9-13 lbs). Miniature Pinschers have a wide muzzle, narrow head, and erect ears, which may be cropped. They have small, round ‘cat feet’ and an erect tail which is usually docked. The Miniature Pinscher has a smooth, graceful gait.

      Coat and Color
      The Miniature Pinscher has a smooth, short, lustrous coat which can be red, stag red, chocolate with tan markings, or black with tan markings. Some standards allow blue and fawn.

      Character
      Miniature Pinschers are alert, bold, spirited and lively. They are extremely energetic; some consider them to be the most energetic of all breeds. Miniature Pinschers are known to act far larger than they really are. They are eternal puppies. The Miniature Pinscher is fearless and loyal, with strong guard and protection instincts. The Miniature Pinscher prefers to let its owner know when it wants to be handled; if it feels pestered it may bite.

      Temperament
      The Miniature Pinscher gets along fine with children, provided it is not pestered by them, in which case it may bite. Small children should be cautioned and supervised to protect the dog from injury. Some Miniature Pinschers are aggressive with other dogs and strangers, but this behavior is not common if proper socialization has taken place.

      Care
      The Miniature Pinscher is easy to groom; it requires only a periodic brushing to remove dead hair. Miniature Pinschers are not well insulated against the cold. Due to the MinPin’s vermin hunting instincts, small objects such as bottle caps can present choking hazards. Miniature Pinschers are prone to obesity; proper nutrition and exercise are important. The Miniature Pinscher has a lifespan of 12-14 years.

      Training
      Training for the Miniature Pinscher must be consistent. The Miniature Pinscher is eager to learn and obeys commands fairly quickly, but it can also be stubborn. As this is a working dog, it is best not to spoil it, as this increases its willfulness. Miniature Pinschers are difficult to housebreak.

      Activity
      The Miniature Pinscher needs regular opportunities to exercise as it is extremely energetic. Most of its needs can be met through indoor play. The Miniature Pinscher is well suited to apartment life.



    • Country of Origin
      The Cane Corso is a descendant of the canis pugnax, dogs used by the Romans in warfare. Its name derives from cane da corso, an old term for those catch dogs used in rural activities (for cattle and swine; boar hunting, and bear fighting) as distinct from cane da camera which indicates the catch dog kept as a bodyguard. In the recent past, its distribution was limited to some districts of Southern Italy, especially in Basilicata, Campania and Puglia.

      The Cane Corso is a catch dog used with cattle and swine, and also in wild boar hunts. It is also used by night watchmen, keepers, and, in the past, by carters as a drover. In the more distant past this breed was common all over Italy as an ample iconography and historiography testify.

      The breed was recovered from near extinction through the efforts of enthusiasts in the 1970s by means of cross-breeding appropriate type selected breeds. The Cane Corso of today is a very different looking dog in comparison to its pre-80's forefathers. The drive has somewhat come down, the breed has more bulk and generally due to the shortening of the muzzle and widening of the skull it has lost its scissor bite. The Corso is now popular globally.[citation needed] Since coming to the United States in 1987, the breed has gained popularity.[citation needed] It was recognized by the United Kennel Club on July 15, 2008 under the name Cane Corso Italiano, and subsequently by the American Kennel Club in 2010 as Cane Corso. Celebrity ownership of Cane Corsi has increased the breed's visibility.

      Character
      The Cane Corso is an Italian breed of dog, for years valued highly in Italy as a companion, guardian and hunter.

      Temperament
      Cane Corso are easy to obedience train, have a willingness to please, and form a close attachment with their primary owner. As puppies, a Corso must have strong leadership and training, and although they easily learn the basic commands, any owner understands that the difficult part is controlling and moulding the Corso's strong protective instinct. Powerful and imposing, a Cane Corso is highly suspicious of strangers, and for this reason aggression should never be encouraged. Because of their need to keep the status quo, a Corso often dislikes new things, animals, and people, so the owner must be careful when introducing the dog to new places and people. Cane Corso tend to be a quiet breed, though they will bark at anything about which they are unsure. For the most part, they like nothing better than staying next to their owner all the time.