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  • Everyone like to have dogs at home but just because of size and neighbor disturbance we usually avoid having dogs at small home or apartments. We have few list of small dogs to keep in apartments.
  • Bull Dogs Bull dogs grows to an average height of 12-16 inch and weights 50-55 lbs, according to Dog Breed Info. It is energetic; it can play well with kids which makes a great companion to them. It will be calm and also courageous breed. Beagle I am not much familiar with Beagle but I analyzed that these breed is mostly used for hunting purpose and also attached to families. Since its toy breed, it can easily accommodate anywhere and also love playing with kids. As like kids, it never tried playing, always active. Usually Beagle used to be very friendly with everyone and also easy go with other pet animals like Cats and so. Labrador Retriever Labrador and Golden Retriever are similar breed. It will be a better choice for kids. It is very active and plays well with kids. Its obedient and intelligent makes us wonder and joyful. Poodle Here standard poodle is a good choice than the small breed. It shed their hair very little than the other breed which is good for children. It is smart and caring dog that can be a good partner with the child. Pug Pugs are playful, friendly and loves being with companion. Pugs are very playful and good partner for children. But Children should be careful while playing with it because Pugs are prone to eye injuries. Golden Retriever It is a sporting breed which is very energetic, active and it love playing with the kids. I it is extremely patience and makes service to their masters. It is closely related to Labrador For More Information, Click on the images name.
  • Planning to buy puppy for your kids? we will help you best breeds from our experience.
  • Plenty of Guard dogs need to be trained properly to know when to attack stranger and speedy alerts...
  • Now-a-day many dogs are brought for the style and royal which may be an imported variety. But buyers should know whether the dog is suited for the Indian climate and whether the dog can be adapted to the warm and hot climate? There are also Non-Indian dogs which are suited for the Indian climatic conditions. The dog breeds which are most suited to our climate are the Beagle, the Labrador, Dachshund, the Pug, Doberman Pinscher, Dalmatian, German Shepherd, Pomeranian are some of the dogs outside India can able to survey in India too under proper caring. The Labrador and Pomeranian sheds hair in hot climate needs extra care during that period. Most dogs sheds their hair in sunny season under proper maintenance you can able to control their sheds. Many Indians show interest in Siberian husky dogs because of their beauty. Siberian husky dogs lives in cold places and very active, they would like to run for a long distance. They love people and mostly need companion. If Siberian husky is kept in the cold climate or in A/c place, it will have good health and long life. As long I have seen and in my experience I would like to tell if you can maintain the same temperature as the native location of it then you can have any such types of breeds as your pets in any place. More over almost all dogs needs good exercise and running, regular Vet checkup, good diet makes the dogs more Energetic, Obedient and Healthy. Some Indian breeds are Indian Pariah, Caravan Hound or Mudhol Hound, Chippiparai, Rajapalayam dog, Rampur Hound, Kombai that will be good in their native climate. Click Here For More Topics

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Dog Breed & Breeders

    • Country of Origin
      The Cane Corso is a descendant of the canis pugnax, dogs used by the Romans in warfare. Its name derives from cane da corso, an old term for those catch dogs used in rural activities (for cattle and swine; boar hunting, and bear fighting) as distinct from cane da camera which indicates the catch dog kept as a bodyguard. In the recent past, its distribution was limited to some districts of Southern Italy, especially in Basilicata, Campania and Puglia.

      The Cane Corso is a catch dog used with cattle and swine, and also in wild boar hunts. It is also used by night watchmen, keepers, and, in the past, by carters as a drover. In the more distant past this breed was common all over Italy as an ample iconography and historiography testify.

      The breed was recovered from near extinction through the efforts of enthusiasts in the 1970s by means of cross-breeding appropriate type selected breeds. The Cane Corso of today is a very different looking dog in comparison to its pre-80's forefathers. The drive has somewhat come down, the breed has more bulk and generally due to the shortening of the muzzle and widening of the skull it has lost its scissor bite. The Corso is now popular globally.[citation needed] Since coming to the United States in 1987, the breed has gained popularity.[citation needed] It was recognized by the United Kennel Club on July 15, 2008 under the name Cane Corso Italiano, and subsequently by the American Kennel Club in 2010 as Cane Corso. Celebrity ownership of Cane Corsi has increased the breed's visibility.

      Character
      The Cane Corso is an Italian breed of dog, for years valued highly in Italy as a companion, guardian and hunter.

      Temperament
      Cane Corso are easy to obedience train, have a willingness to please, and form a close attachment with their primary owner. As puppies, a Corso must have strong leadership and training, and although they easily learn the basic commands, any owner understands that the difficult part is controlling and moulding the Corso's strong protective instinct. Powerful and imposing, a Cane Corso is highly suspicious of strangers, and for this reason aggression should never be encouraged. Because of their need to keep the status quo, a Corso often dislikes new things, animals, and people, so the owner must be careful when introducing the dog to new places and people. Cane Corso tend to be a quiet breed, though they will bark at anything about which they are unsure. For the most part, they like nothing better than staying next to their owner all the time.
    • Country of Origin
      The Neapolitan Mastiff (also known as the ‘Neo’, ‘Mastini’, or ‘Italian Mastiff’) is an Italian breed named after the region of Naples, where most of its development occurred. The Neapolitan Mastiff’s ancient origins are with the Molossians, an early Hellenic tribe known for its powerful guard dogs. In 326 B.C., King Porus of Punjab gave Alexander the Great a pair of Neapolitan Mastiffs which proved quite popular. These dogs were bred widely, producing many offspring which were adapted by the Romans as war dogs and fighters. They were also pit in the Arena against gladiators, bears, and even elephants. The dogs were later crossed with fierce British guard dogs, producing an even larger, more powerful breed resembling the modern Neapolitan Mastiff. It was discovered near Naples in 1946 by Piere Scanziani, who standardized the breed and promoted its development. Few Neapolitan Mastiffs arrived in America until the 1970’s. They were fully recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2004. Neapolitan Mastiffs have inspired portrayals in fictional literature including ‘Fang’ from ‘Harry Potter’ and ‘Pansy’ from Andrew Vachss’ series of Burke detective novels.

      Size
      The Neapolitan Mastiff has a shoulder height of 60-75 cm (23-30 in) and weighs 50-70 kg (110-150 lbs). It has a large, droopy, wrinkled head with large flews (upper lips) and dewlap (wrinkled folds beneath the chin), deep set eyes which are almost entirely covered by folds, and pronounced stop (depression where the muzzle meets the forehead). Loose folds of skin cover nearly the entire body. Neapolitan Mastiffs have a flat back, round feet, and low-hanging tail docked to two-thirds its natural length.

      Coat and Color
      The Neapolitan Mastiff has a short, dense, hard, fine, uniformly smooth coat. The Neapolitan Mastiff can be standard grey, leaden grey, dove-grey, leaden black, brown, fawn, deep fawn, light fawn, or hazel. White patches on the chest and tips of the toes are not uncommon.

      Character
      The Neapolitan Mastiff is confident, gentle-natured, and powerful. Bred as a guard dog, it is highly suspicious of strangers and protective of its property and family. It does not bark unless necessary. Neapolitan Mastiffs are intelligent, majestic, and noble. They do drool and tend to make a mess when eating and drinking.

      Temperament
      Neapolitan Mastiffs are very good with children if socialized early, but close supervision around young children is advised due to their massive size. The Neapolitan Mastiff generally gets along with other dogs and household pets, but socialization when young is recommended. Male Neapolitan Mastiffs may be aggressive with other male dogs.

      Care
      The Neapolitan Mastiff requires frequent cleaning of the dewlap area and facial folds. Other than that, the Neapolitan Mastiff coat requires little attention; dead and loose hairs should be removed with a rubber brush when the Neapolitan Mastiff is shedding. As with all very large dogs, the Neapolitan Mastiff needs a soft place to lie down to avoid pressure marks. The Neapolitan Mastiff has a short lifespan of 8-10 years, with larger dogs tending toward the lower end of that range. Common health problems for Neapolitan Mastiffs include hip and elbow dysplasia (malformed joints which can cause lameness or arthritis), skin infections, and cardiomyopathy. Bloat is another potentially dangerous illness which can be prevented by placing the dog’s food dish on a raised surface, spacing meals throughout the day, and avoiding exercise immediately after meals. Obesity can cause a number of problems for the Neapolitan Mastiff; proper exercise and nutrition are critical. Neapolitan Mastiffs prefer life indoors and are not well suited to hot weather.

      Training
      Neapolitan Mastiff training must be conducted in an atmosphere of mutual respect, with consistency and understanding. This breed is a bit obstinate, but will obey once it understands what is expected of it and recognizes its owner’s authority. Obedience training at a young age is recommended. Neapolitan Mastiffs are happy to learn, but may refuse to perform tricks they consider pointless.

      Activity
      In spite of its large size, the adult Neapolitan Mastiff has only an average need for exercise. It enjoys walks or play in a large fenced-in yard. Puppy Neapolitan Mastiffs should not be over exercised—the Neapolitan Mastiff requires all of its energy to grow strong bones and put on weight because it grows very rapidly. Due to their large size and space requirements, Neapolitan Mastiffs are not recommended for small apartments.
    • Country of Origin
      Tibet.

      Size
      Height: 25 cm (9.75 inches); Weight: 13-15 pounds (5.9-6.8kg)

      Coat and Color
      The topcoat is long and straight. The undercoat is shorter and slightly softer.

      Character
      Lhasa Apsos are calm, loyal, and lovable. They enjoy company, but are wary of strangers.

      Temperament
      This dog gets along well with children, other dogs, and any household pets.

      Care
      The dog must be groomed thoroughly with a brush and comb twice a week. Great care must be taken to avoid breaking the hair. Keep the eyes and ears clean, and trim excess hair from between the pads of the feet.

      Training
      This breed can be somewhat obstinate. Always use positive reinforcement, and never use harsh words.

      Activity
      This dog has normal exercise needs. It is quite happy indoors and doesn't need to go for long walks.