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  • Now-a-day many dogs are brought for the style and royal which may be an imported variety. But buyers should know whether the dog is suited for the Indian climate and whether the dog can be adapted to the warm and hot climate? There are also Non-Indian dogs which are suited for the Indian climatic conditions. The dog breeds which are most suited to our climate are the Beagle, the Labrador, Dachshund, the Pug, Doberman Pinscher, Dalmatian, German Shepherd, Pomeranian are some of the dogs outside India can able to survey in India too under proper caring. The Labrador and Pomeranian sheds hair in hot climate needs extra care during that period. Most dogs sheds their hair in sunny season under proper maintenance you can able to control their sheds. Many Indians show interest in Siberian husky dogs because of their beauty. Siberian husky dogs lives in cold places and very active, they would like to run for a long distance. They love people and mostly need companion. If Siberian husky is kept in the cold climate or in A/c place, it will have good health and long life. As long I have seen and in my experience I would like to tell if you can maintain the same temperature as the native location of it then you can have any such types of breeds as your pets in any place. More over almost all dogs needs good exercise and running, regular Vet checkup, good diet makes the dogs more Energetic, Obedient and Healthy. Some Indian breeds are Indian Pariah, Caravan Hound or Mudhol Hound, Chippiparai, Rajapalayam dog, Rampur Hound, Kombai that will be good in their native climate. Click Here For More Topics
  • Planning to buy puppy for your kids? we will help you best breeds from our experience.
  • Plenty of Guard dogs need to be trained properly to know when to attack stranger and speedy alerts...
  • Everyone like to have dogs at home but just because of size and neighbor disturbance we usually avoid having dogs at small home or apartments. We have few list of small dogs to keep in apartments.
  • Bull Dogs Bull dogs grows to an average height of 12-16 inch and weights 50-55 lbs, according to Dog Breed Info. It is energetic; it can play well with kids which makes a great companion to them. It will be calm and also courageous breed. Beagle I am not much familiar with Beagle but I analyzed that these breed is mostly used for hunting purpose and also attached to families. Since its toy breed, it can easily accommodate anywhere and also love playing with kids. As like kids, it never tried playing, always active. Usually Beagle used to be very friendly with everyone and also easy go with other pet animals like Cats and so. Labrador Retriever Labrador and Golden Retriever are similar breed. It will be a better choice for kids. It is very active and plays well with kids. Its obedient and intelligent makes us wonder and joyful. Poodle Here standard poodle is a good choice than the small breed. It shed their hair very little than the other breed which is good for children. It is smart and caring dog that can be a good partner with the child. Pug Pugs are playful, friendly and loves being with companion. Pugs are very playful and good partner for children. But Children should be careful while playing with it because Pugs are prone to eye injuries. Golden Retriever It is a sporting breed which is very energetic, active and it love playing with the kids. I it is extremely patience and makes service to their masters. It is closely related to Labrador For More Information, Click on the images name.

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Dog Breed & Breeders

    • Country of Origin
      The Boxer was bred in Germany from the Bulldog and the now extinct Bullenbeisser ('bull-biter'). It was bred to chase, bite, and hold onto large game such as dear and boar. The Boxer's name may be derived from the German 'Boxl' for 'short trousers' or from the dog's tendency to stand on its hind legs and swing its forelegs when fighting or playing. U.S. soldiers brought the Boxer home to America where it became a popular pet (the seventh most popular U.S. breed as of 2006) after World War II. In the last century, Boxers have also been put to work as messenger dogs, guard dogs, cattle herders, and police dogs.

      Size
      The Boxer has a shoulder height of 53-63 cm (21-25 in) and weighs 24-32 kg (53-70 lbs). Boxers are strong, compact, and agile, with broad powerful jaws and a small nose which enables it to breathe while hanging onto an animal. Boxers have docked tails and may have cropped ears. They have a distinctive head with long lower jaws and broad muzzles. The Boxer’s head should be unwrinkled, with slight wrinkles on the forehead when concentrating. The Boxer has an arched skull, sloping shoulders, and high tail. Boxers carry themselves proudly.

      Coat and Color
      The Boxer has a short, smooth, shiny coat. It may be fawn (light tan, yellow, or light reddish), brindle (light/dark striped), or red. A black mask around the nose and jaws and white markings (“flashings”) on the belly, chest, and feet are possible, but white should not cover more than a third of the Boxer. The Boxer is an average shedder.

      Character
      The Boxer is happy, friendly, intelligent, attentive, and loyal. Boxers develop strong, close bonds with family. They have lots of energy and a serious demeanor, though they can be clownish and playful as well. They like to grab and carry around just about anything they can in their mouths. Boxers tend to get rowdy when the food bowl is empty. They make excellent guardians and companions.

      Temperament
      The Boxer gets along especially well with children. They also get along well with other dogs and household pets, but may be aggressive towards unknown dogs. It is best if the Boxer undergoes early socialization due to its strong, boisterous personality. Female Boxers may fight each other on occasion. They are naturally inclined to protect you and your family from strangers.

      Care
      The Boxer’s coat can be kept in good condition by brushing occasionally to remove dead hair. The Boxer requires frequent human companionship. Boxers do not like excessively hot or cold weather and should not be left to live outdoors. Some Boxers may snore, drool or have flatulence. White Boxers are at higher risk of deafness. Boxers have an average lifespan of 10-12 years and will remain fit and athletic into old age. They have litters of 2-10 puppies.

      Training
      The Boxer must be trained not to jump up at people as it is naturally fond of jumping. The Boxer is ideal for various sporting activities because it can be highly trained and learns very quickly. Boxers may be stubborn in learning, but they are responsive to commands.

      Activity
      The Boxer needs plenty of physical and mental exercise on a daily basis. They should be allowed to run or go for long walks regularly. Boxers enjoy playing fetch or other activities. They can tolerate apartment life if exercised sufficiently, but a fair-sized yard is ideal. Lonely, inactive Boxers can become stressed out and destructive.
    • Country of Origin
      The Siberian Husky (also known as the ‘Chukcha’, ‘Keshia’, or ‘Arctic Husky’) originated as a sled dog for the Chukchi tribe of Eastern Siberia (in northern Russia) several thousand years ago. It was imported to Alaska in the early 20th century during the Alaskan gold rush. The Siberian Husky attracted attention when it completely dominated native breeds in the 400 mile ‘All-Alaska Sweepstakes’ race from Nome to Candle in 1910, the second year in which it competed. It gained further prominence in 1925 when a gold miner named Leonhard Seppala used a now-famous team of Siberian Huskies to make an urgent delivery of diphtheria serum to Nome, saving thousands of lives. This delivery became known as the ‘Great Race of Mercy’ and attracted much attention to the Siberian Husky. A statue honoring Seppala’s team stands today in Central Park. In 1930, Russia allowed the last group of Siberian Huskies to be exported from Siberia; the breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club that same year. Most Siberian Huskies today descend from the 1930 exports and Leonhard Seppala’s team. Today the Siberian Husky is one of the most popular northern breeds, serving as a pet, sled racing dog, and show dog. Siberian Huskies appear prominently in Disney films ‘Snow Dogs’, ‘Eight Below’, and ‘Iron Will’, all based to some degree on true stories of heroic Siberian Huskies. Siberian Huskies are the mascots of Northeastern University and Michigan Technological University. A female Siberian Husky mix named Laika became the first animal to enter orbit when she was launched into space on Sputnik 2.

      Size
      The Siberian Husky has a shoulder height of 51-60 cm (20-23.5 in) and weighs 15-28 kg (35-60 lbs). It has a round skull with almond-shaped eyes and triangular, erect, furry ears. Some Siberian Huskies have a ‘winter nose’ which fades to pink in the winter; the color change can be permanent in older dogs. The Siberian Husky’s eyes are blue, green, brown, or hazel. ‘Bi-eyed’ Siberian Huskies have one blue eye and one brown or hazel eye while ‘parti-eyed’ Siberian Huskies have irises of blue mixed with another color. The Siberian Husky is one of only a select few breeds which is allowed different-colored eyes in the show ring, and one of only a few breeds to commonly have blue eyes. Siberian Huskies have an arched neck, sickle-curved tail, and furry, oval feet. They have a wolf-like appearance.

      Coat and Color
      The Siberian Husky has a dense, smooth undercoat and coarse outer coat of short, straight hairs. Every color and combination is acceptable; common colors are pure white or white with black, grey, or copper-red, all with possible blond markings. There are a variety of striking facial markings. Siberian Huskies shed twice a year.

      Character
      The Siberian Husky is adventurous, clever, and stubborn. It wants to be everyone's friend, a fact that makes it a less-than-ideal watchdog. Siberian Huskies love to wander, and they are full of energy and independence. The Siberian Husky is known to stage frequent and elaborate escape attempts by jumping over or tunneling under walls. It is very energetic and active when playing, and tends to make interesting whoops, yowls, and ululations.

      Temperament
      The Siberian Husky gets along well with other Huskies, but needs to be trained carefully to interact with other household pets. It tends not to get along with cats or other small animals. Siberian Huskies deal well with children. It is wise to have more than one Siberian Husky because they do not enjoy being left alone.

      Care
      Siberian Huskies require weekly grooming with a brush and comb, particularly on the rear legs, more often when shedding. Bathe only when necessary. The Siberian Husky has a lifespan of 10-14 years. It is generally healthy, but prone to eye problems such as glaucoma and cataracts, and cancer when older. The Siberian Husky has a high propensity for obesity if under exercised, and requires less food than one might expect for its large size; consult your veterinarian for dietary information. Fish oil, which can be found in sardines or flaxseed oil, is a recommended part of the Siberian Husky’s diet. The Siberian Husky is not well suited to warm climates; it needs a cool place to sleep in the summer.

      Training
      The Siberian Husky will only obey commands that make sense to it. It is very independent-minded, so handlers need to have considerable patience and a good understanding of the Siberian Husky’s nature.

      Activity
      The Siberian Husky was bred to pull a heavy sled for countless miles; it demands to be involved in physical activities. If you can't have it pull a sled, let it run alongside you as you jog or ride a bicycle, ideally for at least an hour every day. Siberian Huskies that do not get enough exercise become destructive and loud. They have a low heat tolerance, so do not over exercise them in warm weather. The Siberian Husky is not suited to apartment life.
    • Country of Origin
      The Mastiff (also known as the ‘English Mastiff’) is a British breed which descended from the Alaunt and other Molossers several thousand years ago. ‘Mastiff’ likely derives from the Anglo-Saxon word ‘masty’, meaning ‘powerful’. The Mastiff’s ancient origins are with the Molossians, an early Hellenic tribe known for its powerful guard dogs. In Roman times, the Mastiff was employed as a war dog and fighter, pit in the Arena against gladiators, bears, and even elephants. By the Middle Ages, the Mastiff was a popular guard dog and hunter. Unfortunately, it was still forced to fight, matched up against bears, bulls, and lions in popular gambling dens. Many Mastiffs today descend from the Lyme Hall Mastiffs, a line beginning with Sir Peers Legh’s Mastiff, who protected him after he was wounded at the battle of Agincourt in 1415 (a stained glass window in Lyme Hall depicts Sir Legh and his Mastiff to this day). The Mastiff may have arrived in America on the Mayflower; it had certainly arrived by the 1800’s. Mastiffs decreased in popularity in England after bull-baiting, bear-baiting, and lion-baiting were outlawed, but grew in popularity in the U.S throughout the twentieth century, remaining a popular pet and guardian today. The charming character of the Mastiff has helped it find its way into popular culture. Famous fictional Mastiffs include ‘Hercules’ from ‘The Sandlot’ and ‘Kazak’ from Kurt Vonnegut's ‘The Sirens of Titan’.

      Size
      The Mastiff has a shoulder height of 70-76 cm (27-30 in) and weighs 68-91 kg (150-200 lbs). It is the largest breed by weight. In 1989, a English Mastiff named ‘Zorba’ set the Guinness World Record for heaviest dog at 143 kg (315 lbs), measuring over 8 feet from the tip of the nose to the tip of the tail. Mastiffs have a very large head with a short, wide muzzle, and ‘V’-shaped ears. They have a flat back, high-set, low hanging tail, and large, round feet.

      Coat and Color
      The Mastiff has a short-haired, fawn (light-yellow brown) coat, which ranges in color from silver to apricot to dark brindle. All Mastiffs have a black mask, ears, and nose.

      Character
      The Mastiff has a short-haired, fawn (light-yellow brown) coat, which ranges in color from silver to apricot to dark brindle. All Mastiffs have a black mask, ears, and nose.

      Temperament
      The Mastiff is good with children, and gets along well with other dogs and household pets if properly socialized. In the words of the 1800 Cynographia Britannica ‘What the lion is to the cat, the Mastiff is to the dog. The noblest of the family, he stands alone, all others sinking before him...I have seen him down with his paw the Terrier or cur that has bit him, without offering further injury. In a family he will permit the children to play with him and will suffer all their little pranks without offence.’

      Care
      The Mastiff is good with children, and gets along well with other dogs and household pets if properly socialized. In the words of the 1800 Cynographia Britannica ‘What the lion is to the cat, the Mastiff is to the dog. The noblest of the family, he stands alone, all others sinking before him...I have seen him down with his paw the Terrier or cur that has bit him, without offering further injury. In a family he will permit the children to play with him and will suffer all their little pranks without offence.’

      Training
      Mastiff training must be conducted in an atmosphere of mutual respect, with consistency and understanding. Obedience training at a young age is recommended. Mastiffs are happy to learn, but may refuse to perform tricks they consider pointless.

      Activity
      Mastiff training must be conducted in an atmosphere of mutual respect, with consistency and understanding. Obedience training at a young age is recommended. Mastiffs are happy to learn, but may refuse to perform tricks they consider pointless.